Resources – Varied

As I talk with genealogists or teach classes people will frequently ask me, “Where did you find that (information)?” or “Where did that come from?”. As a historian,  genealogist and librarian I consistently document my sources. It’s important to give credit to the person who found the info or transcribed the document. It’s also great to look for other clues in the same repository. Similar to a great fishing hole. If the fishing is good, you want to return in the hopes of finding more fish or clues about your ancestors.

I’ve lived most of my life in Indianapolis, In. I have a lot of knowledge about that city. The terrain, streets, buildings, events and etc.  My background knowledge of Indianapolis makes research much simpler.

My Paternal line migrated from Kentucky. I visited several times but did not spend any extended time in that state. Therefore my knowledge was limited. As I began to research my paternal lines, lack of knowledge in that area was a real hindrance to my research.  At the time it wasn’t practical to move their or even visit frequently. My solution was to begin researching on Rootsweb.com .  Rootsweb.com was an independently owned and operated consortium of multiple websites, mailing lists (list servs) and message boards. The topics were broken down by states, counties, areas (ie South-Central Kentucky) and surnames, etc. [Rootsweb is now owned by Ancestry.com .  The people that compile the information has not changed all over the site, but in some areas. I am not being paid to advertise for Ancestry.com or Sandi Gorin . I just want to illustrate who owns and or is creating the information. ]

map with ky outline

Around, 1998 (est.) I joined the SC-KY Listserv (South Central Kentucky) SOUTH-CENTRAL-KENTUCKY@rootsweb.com, .  This gave me an opportunity to learn about the area, boundaries, terrain, schools, names of families,etc.) overtime. This helped me to connect to other researchers with information that has helped me during my research , as well as documents etc.

This morning while reading an entry from Sandi Gorin I read the transcription that is listed below.  This tells a little about the climate of Barren County, KY for enslaved persons.

“We’re back at the city meeting again on Saturday, 9 June 1810. This will be a short meeting with John GORIN, Henry CRUTCHER, Will T BUSH, Danl. CULP & John BIRD present.

The only thing on the agenda was appointing the Tax Collector who was Charles HARVEY. He got a 2nd responsibility though that likely could give him grey hair – he was appointed to take care of the Public Spring. The board then adjourned to meet on the 15th.
And, on the 15 the same trustees gathered for business. Charles HARVEY had to be sworn in and post his bond. David WALKER Jr was his surety. While he was there, the tax rate was decided – 25 cents for every tithable and 8 cents on every $100 worth of property.
A continuing problem had to be discussed. Wm T BUSH & John BIRD had to walk around and take notice of all nuisances and obstructions in the city streets and report to the Board. They might get prematurely grey over this also!
Safety was of a great concern in these early days so the Trustees decided to set up a Watch. Joseph WINLOCK & John MATTHEWS Jr named Captains of the Watch and William GRAY, Joel SHAW, Archibald MILLER, William CRUTCHER & Will MARSH Jr were suggested to assist. They had come in to the meeting it appears and they all volunteered.
Some rules and regulations about the Watch were set next. Anyone caught outdoors after 10 pm and couldn’t show why he needed to be walking about would be held and come before the Justice of the Peace the next morning and fined not more than $2.00. (There is an old expression about small towns that they rolled up the streets at night – this definitely was the case here!)
Also the slaves – if more than three were collected together, unless they are all the property of the same man, and not found on their quarters and were disorderly – the Watch man to note this and they to be whipped at the order of the Captain, not more than 15 lashes. So sad. 
Also they could not be out after 9pm with the same penalty. It was the fear that the slaves were gathering and planning an escape or some harm. Adjourned.
We’ll jump ahead, a meeting was planned in July but for some reason they didn’t meet until 10 August 1810. The same Trustees attended and some bills had to be paid: Charles Harvey was to pay Henry CRUTCHER for buying that minute book & working on the Spring – $28.00. Thomas DICKINSON was paid $3.00 for his services as a Commissioner; the Judges and Clerk were paid $2.75 each for an election and W MARSH was paid
$4.75 for acting as the Clerk. Charles HARVEY was paid 10% of the taxes collected. The Clerk (MARSH) was the person authorized to collect fines imposed and paid $1.00 a day for his services. He had to find his own paper that he needed.
Danl CULP and John BIRD were next appointed Commissioners to superintend
the repairing of Cross Street from the sign post to Thomas GOODALL’s – this section to be bridged over the mud.
They closed with another ordnance: “Be it ordained by the Board of  Trustees of the Town of Glasgow that any person or persons who have a  Dwelling House Kitchen or shop within said Town not having a brick or Stone Chimney Shall have a good Calked (caulked) chimney to be at least eighteen inches above the Comb. of said House and to have a good Stove.
If one of the citizens shall fail to build their chimney as described above described within There, after being notified, shall forfeit & pay the sum of Ten Dollars. Also, all black smiths, nailers, gun Smiths, silver smiths & copper smiths within the said town shall have the Top of their Shop Chimneys arched over and any who may be notified by any of the Trustees and fail to comply with the above ordinance within this month after being so notified shall forfeit and pay the sum of five dollars.”
The Board then adjourned. /s/ Jno GORIN.

 

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle~

The Power of Photographs

I just read a wonderfully powerful story. One that would not have been possible with out photographs.   The heroine of the story is Annie Correal,  a reporter for the New York Times.  I am so happy that she took the time to rescue this precious photo album and return it to the family members it was connected to. It was quite a lengthy search.

I hope that the photographs I take today, will continue to tell the story of my family.  It’s also a cautionary tale about labeling pictures with dates, full names and locations.

Read it for yourself and tell me what you think.

Love & Black Lives

 

Speaking Engagements

I am available for speaking engagements, consultations, family reunions and other genealogical events, Black History Month, African American History, Black Culture & Literature. Please contact me to schedule a meeting or a phone conference. No project is too small.

Prepare now for your Family Reunion Have you been meaning to gather your family but were always too busy?  I can help you gather the family history you already have and help create a plan for gathering more information and more importantly ways to share it with your family.

Family Reunion projects could include:

  • Family Tree Display
  • Family History Workshop
  • Pre-reunion Research
  • Customized Options

Nichelle
Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

New Database will help African Descended Researchers

New Database to help break the 1870 Barrier

The recent crowd sourcing of the Freedmen’s Bureau and other databases that have connected research that was previously hard to find will be a boon to people researching their African Roots. Great news for 2018!!  Check it out and share your results. I can’t wait to dive in.  Follow the link above for details!

 

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle~

 

 

Douglass Park History

Great information regarding the origins of Douglass Park.

African American Suburbia

by Kyle Huskins

In July, 1926 the Indianapolis Recorder complained that they could only reserve space or visit the city's "Jim Crow" park, Douglass Park. This would remain true into the 1960's. In July, 1926 the Indianapolis Recorder complained that they could only reserve space or visit the city’s “Jim Crow” park, Douglass Park. This would remain true into the 1960’s.

Douglass Park is one of the most historic parks in Indianapolis. It is named after the African-American intellectual Frederick Douglass, who played a pivotal role in the abolitionist movement and is one of the most recognizable African-American scholars of his time. The name of the park honors his memory and there is a mural of him on the wall of the Family Center. Douglass Park is located on the east side of Indianapolis. The address is 1611 East 25th Street in the midst of the Martindale-Brightwood community. Now the park is easily accessible from the Monon Trail and features a playground, tennis courts, picnic facilities, baseball diamonds, basketball courts, football fields and a paved fitness trail…

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FREE Online Webinar Sponsored by the Georgia Genealogical Society

FREE Online Webinar Sponsored by the Georgia Genealogical Society
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
8:00 pm to 9:15 pm EST
Forget Me Not: Preserving Legacies with EPOCH by Donna Bachowski, MLS
Created by the Orange County Library System with a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, EPOCH (Electronically Preserving Obituaries as Cultural Heritage) is a website that allows anyone to create and publish a free obituary online. With the decline in newspaper obituaries, EPOCH was developed as a digital repository of user-contributed obituary information that will be held for future generations of researchers and genealogists. Family and friends of the deceased can submit detailed obituaries as a tribute to their loved ones and share a meaningful memory with the residents of the community. This presentation will describe the history of EPOCH, demonstrate how to create a tribute, and share ideas on how it can be used with both historical and contemporary obituaries.

Indiana Genealogical Society 2017 Conference – Keynote Speaker Tony Burroughs

I co-chaired an amazing conference yesterday. The Indiana Genealogical Society 2017 Conference with Keynote Speaker Tony Burroughs. This is an annual event that is held at various locations around the state.

This will be a quick post. I didn’t want to let a day go by without sharing.

I co-chaired an amazing conference yesterday.  The Indiana Genealogical Society (IGS) 2017 with Keynote Speaker Tony Burroughs. This is an annual event that is held at various locations around the state.

Great attendance, amazing conversations with genealogists and invaluable insights from Nationally known speaker and author of “Black Roots” Tony Burroughs.  (Look for him on tonight’s episode of “Who Do You Think You Are” TLC 10pm E/9pm CST Smokey Robinson.

Action –  (So much info. I’ll be processing my notes for the next month.)

Continue reading “Indiana Genealogical Society 2017 Conference – Keynote Speaker Tony Burroughs”